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(207) 846-6515

ENDOCRINOLOGY: HYPERTHYROIDISM IN CATS: Y/D

Y/D

Y/D is a very high quality maintenance food for cats. It is complete and balanced except for a lack of iodine. Iodine is necessary for a cat to make thyroid hormone, so limited iodine intake controls hyperthyroidism. Iodine from other food sources, including treats and another pet's food, can compromise the effectiveness of Y/D, so it is critical that your cat eat only Y/D. There are no other cat foods with the carefully limited amount of iodine that Y/D has, so there are no other foods that can be used to manage hyperthyroidism.

FEEDING AMOUNTS

Canned and/or dry Y/D can be used. When feeding only dry, the following amounts can be used as a starting point, and then adjusted if necessary to maintain appropriate body weight:
Body Weight (lb)     Cups               or  Cans
   6                            1/4-3/8                3/4-1
   10                           3/8-5/8                1 1/4-1 2/3
   14                           1/2-3/4                1 1/2-2
   18                            2/3-7/8                1 3/4-2 1/2

When using canned and dry food together, decrease amounts proportionately to avoid overfeeding.
1 can = 3/8 cup dry,  1 cup dry = 2 3/4 cans

TRANSITIONING FROM METHIMAZOLE

Some cats are taking methimazole, an anti-thyroid hormone medication, at the time Y/D is started.

Transition to Y/D by adding a small amount to your cat's current food. Increase the amount of Y/D and decrease the amount of the original food until your pet is eating only Y/D. This should happen over 7 days, but some cats need up to several weeks in transition. 

When you start the transition, decrease the methimazole dose by 50%. 

Discontinue the methimazole when your cat has been eating Y/D exclusively for 1 to 2 weeks.

We advise rechecks at 1 and 2 months after the transition is complete, and then every 6 months thereafter. Rechecks include a physical exam and sometimes thyroid hormone measurement, blood and urine profiles. If your cat has other health problems in addition to hyperthyroidism we may advise more frequent rechecks.

MANAGING HYPERTHYROIDISM WITH Y/D IN A NEWLY DIAGNOSED PATIENT

Transition to Y/D by adding a small amount to your cat's current food. Increase the amount of Y/D and decrease the amount of the original food until your pet is eating only Y/D. This should happen over 7 days, but some cats need up to several weeks in transition. 

We advise rechecks at 1 and 2 months after the transition is complete, and then every 6 months thereafter. Rechecks include a physical exam and sometimes thyroid hormone measurement, blood and urine profiles. If your cat has other health problems in addition to hyperthyroidism we may advise more frequent rechecks.

FEEDING MULTIPLE CATS

Y/D can be safely fed to cats that do not have hyperthyroidism, but these cats should have a meal of a complete and balanced food every day or two or three, in order for them to have some iodine in their diet. 

TREATS  

Some treats can safely be fed to cats with hyperthyroidism, and some have too much iodine. 

OK TO FEED WITH Y/D   Cosequin, Dasuquin, Epakitin, Miralax, Laxatone, Renal K+, CET Toothpaste, Viralys, Tumil-K, Benazapril, Metacam, Tonic Lax

NOT RECOMMENDED TO FEED WITH Y/D   PetMeds VitaChews, Azodyl, Gold Vet Potassium citrate, Welactin Feline, Fortiflora, Feline Greenies Pill Pockets, Felovite, Nutrical, Glycoflex, CET Oral Hygiene Chews

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Hill's Nutritional Consultant  1-800-4455-5777

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